A GUIDE TO RESPONSIBLE PROJECT MANAGEMENT:

a collaboration between ASP, Bournemouth University and Association for Project Management (APM)

What is Responsible Project Management?

Responsible Project Management (RPM) is the concept of managing projects with conscious attention to the intended and unintended impacts of the project and its outcomes, in both the short term and long term. Impacts on the environment, people, as well as the financial costs. The aim is to nurture and enhance natural, human and economic resources, and to deliver value without preference to stakeholders representing environmental, social and financial interests.

“In July 2018 Bournemouth University brought together sustainability practitioners, professional project managers, researchers and students in different disciplines and from several universities in the UK and the Netherlands to begin discussing what being responsible in project management might mean.

 

The Guide is the first output (attached). One focus of the workshop was the competencies that Responsible Project Managers will need and how these might be nurtured. Further research is planned we invite your engagement and participation.

Karen Thompson, Head of Education and Professional Practice
Department of Leadership, Strategy and Organisation,
Bournemouth University

 

The Guide is a first step on the long road to improving professionalism. It offers a set of eight principles that could form the basis of taking responsibility for our decisions and actions. I would urge professionals, students and academics to read the guide and engage in the conversation.”

Darren Dalcher, Professor in Strategic Project Management,
Founder and Director of the National Centre for Project Management,
Lancaster University

 

To be responsible means to understand the impacts and consequences of actions and deeds. Professionals have to think carefully about this term as if one couples the obligation to be responsible with the requirement to be accountable, and then there are the conditions for identification of the parties that caused things to happen,”

Andrew Edkins,
The Bartlett Real Estate Institute, UCL

 

“…this dovetails well into the recent Royal Charter for the Association for Project Management, and their supporting white papers exploring professional responsibilities, codes and conduct, ethical considerations, and areas of potential political, intellectual and moral irresponsibility in the delivery of our project work.”

Rob Leslie-Carter, Director, Arup

 

“Defining the purpose of a project in these terms gives the project manager a completely different mandate: the opportunity to create valuable and valued outcomes and in turn to have a more valued and valuable career.

Creating sustainable projects is not easy. We don’t know yet how to do that. We need to develop the techniques, tools and models that will deliver this.”

Gwyn Jones, Director,
Association of Sustainability Practitioners

The next step in the process…

‘Creative Futures in Projects and Programmes’ will bring together project practitioners and researchers for a unique dialogue about the future of project management.  With a focus on the human dimension of projects, this will be a showcase for current qualitative research on projects and will feature initiatives from practice and student research.  A series of presentations, posters and videos will prompt creative thinking and discussion of what the future might hold for project and programme management.

Dr Karen Thompson of the Department of Leadership, Strategy and Organisations, Bournemouth University, is delighted to be collaborating once again with Dr Paul Summers of the University of Winchester, UCL and the Association for Project Management to host a project management event in:

London on 8th November 2018 as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science.

‘Creative Futures in Projects and Programmes’ will bring together project practitioners and researchers for a unique dialogue about the future of project management.  With a focus on the human dimension of projects, this will be a showcase for current qualitative research on projects and will feature initiatives from practice and student research.  A series of presentations, posters and videos will prompt creative thinking and discussion of what the future might hold for project and programme management.

https://blogs.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/2018/10/18/creative-futures-in-projects-and-programmes-event-in-london-for-esrc-festival-of-social-science-2018/

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